Friday, March 23, 2018
Get Adobe Flash player

Remember when Facebook bought and then shut down Beluga back in 2011? Well, almost three years later, Zuck’s finally putting features from his first group-messaging-app purchase to use. The latest update to Messenger on iOS lets you group contacts together however you’d like, and spam ’em with animal stickers (or texts) en masse. Along with the typical stability fixes and speed improvements, the change log notes that you can now forward messages and photos to users that aren’t in your current conversation too — pretty much the opposite of Snapchat.

Facebook buys virtual reality headset start-up for $2bn

Posted by Nuttapon_S On March - 26 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Facebook has announced it will buy Oculus VR, a Californian company which specialises in virtual reality products, for around $2bn (£1.2bn).

The start-up’s flagship product, the Oculus Rift, is a goggle-like “immersive” headset for video gaming.

It was developed with funds raised through crowdfunding site Kickstarter, and subsequent investment.

Facebook’s boss, Mark Zuckerberg, said Oculus’ technologies could “change the way we work, play and communicate”.

The Oculus Rift has yet to be released, but more than 75,000 orders for development kits have already been placed, according to the social media giant.

In a statement released on Tuesday, Facebook said it plans to expand the use of Oculus technologies to include “communications, media and entertainment, education and other areas”.

Oculus’ crowdfunding campaign raised $2.4m (£1.5m), 10 times the amount originally sought.

It subsequently received a further $75m from investors.

The Rift headset was widely heralded at the CES technology show in Las Vegas in January, where Sony also announced a rival product.

The deal includes $400m in cash and just over 23 million Facebook shares, valued at $1.6bn.

Game developers hope that the Oculus Rift will bring virtual reality into the 21st century

Oculus employees will also receive an additional $300m if the company achieves certain targets.

Commenting on the deal, Mr Zuckerberg said: “Mobile is the platform of today, and now we’re also getting ready for the platforms of tomorrow.”

It is the latest purchase for Facebook, which last month spent $19bn on mobile messaging platform WhatsApp.

Facebook launched ten years ago in February 2004. A month later, so did this site. Social media hasn’t, doesn’t and won’t stay still. As Myspace rises, Friendster declines. The pattern’s repeated itself a few times already, and even Google hasn’t quite cracked the magic social network formula, at least not yet. The crown currently belongs to Facebook, a company that’s made some bigbig startup purchases on the way, although Twitter continues to pack (arguably) more influence. A whole lot has happened in the last decade, but we’ve tried to squeeze the more interesting parts into something a little more visual. Check out the full ‘graphic, right after the break.

Facebook head complains to Obama over privacy

Posted by Nuttapon_S On March - 14 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Mark Zuckerberg says he called US president over surveillance, and says government policy is damaging the internet.

Mark Zuckerberg, the head of Facebook, has revealed that he telephoned the US president to complain that the US government is undermining confidence in the internet.

In a post on his Facebook page on Thursday, Facebook’s founder expressed anger towards Washington, in what appeared to be a reaction to some of the latest revelations about US government surveillance.

“I’ve called President Obama to express my frustration over the damage the government is creating for all of our future,” he wrote. “Unfortunately, it seems like it will take a very long time for true full reform.”

Zuckerberg’s comments come amid growing tensions between the technology sector and US administration over leaked documents describing the vast surveillance ability of the National Security Agency and other spy services.

“The internet works because most people and companies do the same. We work together to create this secure environment and make our shared space even better for the world,” he said.

“The US government should be the champion for the internet, not a threat. They need to be much more transparent about what they’re doing, or otherwise people will believe the worst.”

Facebook users have consistently expressed their concern over the social media network’s data collection practices, and how it uses private information.

The comments come a day after a report citing leaked NSA documents said the secretive spy agency had imitated a Facebook server to inject malware into computers to expand its intelligence collection capacity.

The report by former Guardian reporter Glenn Greenwald said the NSA had developed malware that allows it to collect data automatically from millions of computers worldwide.